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20130129
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of the environment is very important. it is a direct relationship with the high breast cancer rates, a cancer rates in particular, but also breast cancer, and to some degree childhood obesity, there's a correlation between the environment people are growing up in. when we talk about my legislative priorities, the environment is also on that list of priorities. minimizing asthma, maintaining the asman task force, that we will keep implementing that my predecessors started, educating people on healthy lifestyles, exercise, healthy diet. we talked about the environment. it is about the food we are taking into our body, our stress level, and a component that is not often discussed as our mental health -- is our mental health. mental health and physical health factor into the environment that people are living in. it is in their home, it is in the neighborhood, it is the whole southeast quadrant. any way you guys sit up, we have had our disproportionate share -- you dice it up, we have had our disproportionate share of problems that are happening. the policies and priorities of the city have been implem
under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city w
to our clients and reduced costs and really improved the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
that does have broad political support, but the price tag is controversial. >> angela merkel's environment minister says he wants to free the levy that is paid by consumers to fun that transition. it is billed as a temporary measure -- to fund that transition. it is billed as a temporary measure. >> electronic -- electricity prices are rising. with an election looming, the environment mr. is -- minister is putting on the brakes. subsequent rises would also be limited. >>> i do not think it is right that consumers and small and medium-sized businesses carry all the risk of electricity price rises as a result of the move towards renewables. >> industries that use a lot of electricity also face changes. until now, they were exempted from the clean energy surcharge. under the proposals, they will pnow have to pay their share. chancellor merkel's deputy has given his backing to the plans. >> i believe it is right not to proceed in small steps. we need a big, bold move, and a fundamental reform of the law on subsidizing renewable energy. >> the government will need the backing of the opposition
into that environment can be really traumatic and humiliating. >> jon: i'm going to jump in here. first of all, i know a lot of german businessmen who would pay good money for that. secondly, you're in a war zone. you're in a war zone and your big worry is dying of embarrassment? and by the way, i think i figured something out here. if men are going to be poohing inches from their female comrade's face, i believe that solves your eros problem. eros is irrational but it's not [bleep] crazy. all right. our own samantha bee explores this more in depth with this report >> reporter: last week defense secretary leon panetta made military history when he lifted the ban on women serving in combat. immediately, objections were raised. >> there is a difference in the physicality of women and men >> it's a terrible idea. you're going to have the sex assault problem >> people are going to die reporter: author and military expert kingsley brown >> women in combat positions are a threat to military cohesion. it's not clear that men can actually bond with women the way they bond with other women >> reporter: so wome
environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
and driven to succeed. we like that. melissa: and you should be comfortable in the environment. a very interesting stuff. thank you for coming on. >> absolutely. thank you for having me. melissa: next up, boeing is baffled by the ion battery. they may not be the root of the massive problems of the dream liner. could this have a bigger impact on the economy? have you notice stores in your area are charging you just to use your credit card? businesses in 40 states canal had customers with checkout fees. we will tell you why and what you can do and what to look for. piles of "money" coming up. ♪ stay top of mind with customers? from deals that bring them in with an offer... to social media promotions that turn fans into customers... to events that engage and create buzz... to e-mails that keep loyal customers coming back, our easy-to-use tools will keep you in front of your customers. see what's right for you at constantcontact.com/try. ♪ melissa: still no news from boeing on what exactly is causing all the problems that have grounded the entire fleet of streamliners. at first the lit
was a delight to work with, and together, we produced an article -- the energy environment conflict: fighting electric power facilities -- which was published in 1972. when bob graduated from uva he left a real hole in my life, but i knew for sure he was going to accomplish great things. we kept in touch as his career progressed until fbi swallowed him in 2001. bob's legal career has been mainly in public service with interruptions for private practice. all of his focus on criminal law, financial fraud, public corruption, narcotics, conspiracies, money laundering, terrorists. he first became known in san francisco where he served in the u.s. attorney's office, rising to be chief of the criminal division. thereafter, he moved to boston as assistant u.s. attorney and then to the u.s. justice department in washington where he led the criminal division. in 1998, bob returned to san francisco as united states attorney. please join me in welcoming my good friend and one of america's most distinguished public servants, robert muller. [applause] >> let me start off by thanking mason for that kind int
in the trash. >> that's a huge number. it's not good for the environment. it's not good for financially. >> reporter: so we brought in our food industry insider marcus samuelson the owner of red reaster restaurant. if you ran your kitchen the way americans run their kich man would happen to your business? >> we would be close. >> reporter: we decided to pay a visit for kitchen tips. we watched what was caught on tape, leftovers to uneaten deli meat and lettuce looking wilted. >> here is a challenge, throwing out produce. >> when we think it is not fresh there is a couple more days. >> the use by date and the sell buy bi-is different than the expiration. the first tip, learn the lynn doe, sell by, use by or best by does not mean toss by. often you can eat it several days to a week after. use by is the time item will be top quality but you can use it many days after that if stored properly. we pulled up ready to meet the dickinsons and headed to the refrigerator to see what rebecca was about to throw out. >> i have food that i made last week. >> reporter: the squash soup from a week ago a
, the impact is stronger because they're less affected by the direct environment. >> are we enter ago harder market? which is to say can insurance companies start to raise premiums across the board? >> it varies a lot by line of bit in my country, but certainly post super storm sandy there will be hardening of rates. in the uk, though, with the rates going down, even though motor has been not that profitable -- >> why is that. >> because the competition is a pretty competitive environment. >> and we had changes in the motor race, though. we've had a big eu change on the agenda. >> yeah. >> we don't know how that's going to come out in the wash, do we? >> that changes things around. but in the short-term, it does mean that the markets are a little more volatile and it has been a sizable change. >> it's just unfortunate to some degree that these natural disasters which affect many people and are stressful events to live through then cause insurance premium toes rise, which sounds like that's what's happening in part of the u.s. >> it varies, but long-term insurers will look to make profit over
you for that. i take that experience and i realized in the gang environment, most of these youths are coming from single- family households. in the area where the gang violence is most prevalent, great citizens of the community, 99% of those citizens are afraid. as a prosecutor, i take this experience and figure out how i want to enforce gang violence, especially in san francisco. i break it down into three categories. you have the individual who is not fully immersed in the gang lifestyle. he is just an associate comment just hanging out. -- associates, just hanging out. for that individual, we try to work with community-based programs. i've met with dcyf, the african- american steering committee, people haven't been in this violence and i say to them, what can -- people have been in this violence, and i say to them, what can we do to make sure if this individual does not go to prison? for that individual, we try to find a way to keep him out of the prison sentence. then you have the second individual, the individual who does crimes not for economic means, but for someone who has
rates. the bank announced on tuesday that it will provide an appropriate interest rate environment to support growth as inflation risks lessen. >>> members of the japanese cabinet approved the biggest budget on record for 2013. it totals over $1 trillion. the draft budget reflects shinzo abe's determination to stimulate japanese government by boosting government expenditures. public works spending will increase for the first time in four years. the government plans to spend over $770 billion to implement its policies. that's up about 3% in yen terms from the current fiscal year. it has earmarked more than $240 billion for servicing government debt or an increase of over 1%. also for the first time in four years, tax revenues are expected to exceed what the government would get by issuing new bonds. the government expects tax revenues to total over $473 billion, or nearly 2% more than in this fiscal year. meanwhile, new bond offerings will fall by 3% to about $470 billion. japan still relies on government bond sells for 46% of its total revenue. the outstanding balance of government
that asked the mayor and the department of environment is to create an independent recycling master plan that outlines the recycling need of city and curb side pick up and support anden senior sure san francisco's program for the city to reach zero waist in 5020 and developing and implementing a recycling program for got golden gate park. and the resolution recommended that the department work in good faith allowing to serve golden gate park and continue to provide san franciscoians the capacity to recycle the material and eligible for curb side pick up what was a response? no response. no meetings no answer to our letters no attempt to discuss. three weeks ago, we left, there was such concern in the neighborhood, 100 people testified for this resolution that people began to go to the site there is no process established by recognize and park to determine what will happen on this site or do recycling this will happen as a sequence --. >> hi my name is michael ash burn and i'm a residental of the richmond and i would like to show you what i witnessed two days after the orderly evi
and an environment r requirement to speak english and pass a civics test. why is the gop getting on board now. >> elections, elections, the republican party is losing the support of our hiss tannic citizens. >> -- hispanic citizens the plan also require it is country secure the borders. . >> and the president will soon decide on a bill to send more than 5(000)000-0000 to help with the relief efforts from superstorm sandy. the senatepassed the bill today. ifsigned the money will go to help people and businesses trying to rebuild from the storm. >> ill lis it evidence played in the barnes murder case. apornographic video was played. the prosecution says that's when the dynamic between barnes and johnson changed. they claimjohnson killed barnes and dumped her body. the trial picks up again tomorrow morning in annapolis, anne arundal county john dee pold did not take the stand -- leopold did not take the stand in his own defense. he faces three counts of misconduct in office and one count of fraud tomorrow we'll learn more thabt sxhan the miracle surgery he had here in baltimore. he was the
made a splash a couple years ago and a new e-book. what is your new idea for saving the environment? >> the big idea is we spent 20 years on global warming trying to make fossil fuels more expensive. that didn't work. there's an important shift that needs to be made to making clean energy safe. >> stephen: what is your idea clean coal? >> all the technologies. >> stephen: clean coax you are on board. >> if they can figure out a way to cheaply capt tiewrt coal it needs to be put on the list. >> stephen: clean cool. that takes care of all of it. you are not like a tree hugger kind of guy, right? >> i am sort of a tree hugger. >> stephen: you are? they don't hug you back. it's a one-way relationship. >> most people what they care about is, you know, things on the economy and jobs. i think we say look, we all care about the same things. we want the same things from energy, we want it to be cheap, reliable and increasingly clean. that's what we've gotten over the centuries. we've gone from wood to coal, coal to gas and renewables. it's done through technology innovations. it's something
. it is a shame for his legacy, but can anybody conceivably in this environment say we have to raise taxes on the middle class if they're in elected office? >> the reality is the present tax code is a disaster. yes, you can raise tax revenue and you can get people behind it if indeed you do it by saying let's scrap huge chunks of the present tax code that make no sense in going the direction of a tax code that is competitive to the rest of the world the tax court hurts us, and frankly will bring down what i call the compliance tax. how many people do their own taxes now and pay millions if not billions of dollars in the country as a whole to get somebody else to figure this thing out. i would pay a higher rate if i knew i didn't have to pay the extra $2000 cut $2500 per year to the accountant to tell me what its supposed to be. it is a serious one. liz: texas have made more liars than a golf hats, but if you're going to do tax reform it took years, you have to start it now, right? >> raise taxes on the middle class, the budget agreement did. starting january 1my own experience of a governo
the environment as changed the degree is somewhat different. now those effects might become dominant. yes, i can see a down side for doing things that you believe are effective and legal and appropriate if it denies you the cooperation of others who see it in a different way. i think we're all aware of that. we knew that. in 2006, it was huddle up, the world has changed, what is appropriate going forward with no judgment whatsoever on what went on before. different circumstances, different people. not -- >> not having read the report, i would say that become its released it needs to be fixed if, in fact the interrogation program had no value. they need to take a second look and maybe spend more time and talk to those who were involved in the program. in terms of the ethical question, in writing hard measures, i spent a lot of time talking to people who worked with me. some of my deputies were very senior analysts, very logical. these are folk who is will analyze every aspect of everything. i asked him this question and he gave me a long explanation, 15 -minute explanation on why he thought it w
's futuristic. >> i think it will allow you to have more access to your environment. you're never realizing what is around you if you do, you might spot sergio wearing the glasses. >> we have him on a subway we're sitting opposite a serious big data geek on the train. >> it looks like a public relations plan as every tech company seems to be working on glasses google is working on a reason for to you buy theirs. >> what kept everybody from commercializing this is figuringing oit secret sauce that would make ordinary users wanted to wear these things. >> coming up next, a supreme court justice revealing secrets from the past. >> introduction to witch craft. >> people understood what my purpose was in writing about it. that everybody has a >>> supreme court justice sot sotomayor told a crowd in san francisco her key to success. her rise from a bronx house prog jekt to highest court in the country is the subject of her new book. abc 7 news was at her book signing this afternoon. justice sotomayor came to talk about her journey as described in the new book. my beloved world. >> i had a friend who wa
really is leading this enormous change on the enterprise i.t. environment. let's call a broadly the consumerization of i.t. the problem that brings is that while you're happily wandering into the enterprise every day with your klauer in your pocket, a whole bunch of that actually belongs to somebody else. it belongs to another interest. maybe multiple interests. so your personal consumption of cloud is quite literally a threat to your employer. let's be very clear. the very recent publicized attacks against rsa were the key seeds for the technology was stolen. the attacks on google. the attacks published just this week against u.s. defense interests. were initiated from users like you. ok? humans like you to click on a url, an attachment in e-mail, and let the bad guys in. for most of the enterprise world, the public cloud is nothing more than a menace. yet, we see it's clear benefits. we see its enormous cost advantages. we see all these wonderful things that tin told you about. so the challenge is to try and evolve what today is a process built around people. people and proces
to let go of this thing you have been charged with looking after. it could be a regulatory environment, but it could just be that your job is built around regulate -- making this thing work. so we have a skill set issue, too. in general, they are building protocols for security reasons and a bunch of other things. in general, it is absolutely in existing i.t. people's interests to build a private club because they get to keep their jobs. so they are off doing that. but the broader concern that is articulate it is one of security and control. and the public clout is been generally branded by the enterprise segment as being untrustworthy unless it is backed by a particular promise to have some major brand like microsoft or google or whatever. what has been lacking has been standards related to a customer of visibility to reason about the cloud. but we have some good anecdotal evidence that people will focus on a cloud for a living will do a far better job than you would ever if you were building your own i.t. system. a good way to think about this would be if you look back on wikileaks a
. some of our panelists will address those. even though now we are in an environment where there is a republican majority in the house and a slimmer majority in the senate, please note that the leader and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart our economy, and there will be more work to be done. i would like to hand over the podium to nicole rivera, who put this together. she will introduce the panelists and go over some logistics. i want to point out quickly that we are being recorded by san francisco government tv. the camera in front is only aimed at the podium. it is not taking shots of the audience, only the podium for people who want to ask questions. so do not worry, you are not on tv if you do not want to be. >> thank you for your patience. i am a representative with leader pelosi, and i'm thrilled to have you today to learn more of our best practices for accessing credit. it is a priority for our office. we are very well aware of how small businesses are running up against the wall right now in terms of trying to get the credit and loans th
place on earth and put millions of people to work including in a more secure environment. we are barely scratching the surface of natural gas use. there isn't enough natural gas to sell cars in this country. what a sad set of circumstances. stick with cramer.
-rate environment and banks effectively being unwilling to lend at these low rates. i think that is a fantastic point for the near term. more long-term, our real worry is about the exit. >> susie: real quickly, i want to ask you about the jobs report that comes out on friday because more people get jobs, it is good for the economy. >> right. >> susie: might there be a surprise that more hiring is going on? >> we do not expect any surprises, at least not any upward surprises. it is interesting, almost over any time bucket over the last year, the average job gain has been about 150,000 mer month. 150,000 -- per month. where the aggregate demand hasn't picked up, companies are not picking up the hiring. we're looking for 150,000 a month, per average. >> susie: that's kind of look warm, but thank you, tom for coming on the show. we've been talking with tom porcelli, chief mist at rbc cap >> tom: despite a strong end to the year, ford stock fell more than 4.5% today. the concern is, ford doesn't think this year will be much better than last year. the auto maker earned 31 cents a share, up from a yea
people feel manipulated. >> environment is structured to make them behave in a certain way? >> how can i feel? manipulated that i am being encouraged to be healthy. if anything i'm grateful that a company that essentially needs me to do productive work to help them do their business cares to help me be a healthier individual. i can't complain. anybody who does is misguided. >>reporter: don't work for going toll like a nudge here and there to make healthy choices even not aware. this is from new york. >> wow! just for the record spencer rides a scooter through the newsroom on occasion. >> snowmobile stunt at the x games takes a very dangerous turn. see what happens. st ♪ i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! my bowl, my spoons! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios has whole grain and 110 delicious calories. ...more grains. less you! multigrain cheerios in multi-grain cheerios peanut butter. another mishap frightening one at the snowmobile competitio
% per year. all right? so higher rate environments don't necessarily mean, or not mutually exclusive of positive and constructive equity market returns. >> charles, i want to ask barry the same question after i ask you, but i would -- give me a number on where you think it would hurt? because i could see, i could see all the way up to 4.5% being construed as a positive. which is still such a low historical number for a ten-year, for whatever, i could see where that would help savers, it would help, you know, the return on some pension plans, and it would indicate economic growth much better than we have right now. it's something that japan wishes they had for the past 20 years, because it would at least indicate some economic activity. i can't even imagine it would be a headwind all the way up to 4.5% or 5% for equities. i don't know about the mortgage market. what do you think, charles? >> it's not just the absolute level, joe. >> but years from now, two, three years. we're going to get back there eventually, right? >> eventually i think we will. and i think if the path is a control
-lingual time. there are so many parts of the culture where spanish is a huge part of the environment. the speaking english, saying, yes we should do this. this is a tip of the hat to the conservatives. then we change the standards we have out there from state to state. some states have adopted a multi-language requirements for some tests and different aspects of government. do we change all of that? and go right back to english? what does that say to the -- to the latino-speaking community that has spent so much time trying to foster their own language as it were. >> then, after all of that, they guild to the back of the line, for citizenship. michael, thanks for trying to simplify a very complicate the process. have a great day. >> thanks. >> weather alert for you now. an outbreak of dangerous weather. here it is, folks. take a look at the screen, across the midwest, tormaido watches in effect. we will get updates from janet coming up. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] what are happy kids made of? bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of gri
an environment that the president of the united states feels comfortable coming on their network without any concern he might be challenged and therefore look bad or stupid. atlantic panned the interview calling it embarrassing failure is that uncovered no new information, arguing the daily show's jon steb wart asks tougher questions. "there is something deeply wrong with american journalism when the host of a half-hour comedy show with a left-leaning audience easily outperforms an award-winning "60 minutes" correspondent." a 5-year-old boy in cape cod, massachusetts, faces a possible suspension from his after-school program. after building a gun out of legos. yes, legos. the boy's parents say the school is taking things too far and a little bit of reedestruction would have been enough. they point out again the boy is 5 years old. the principal of the elementary school told the affiliate fox 25, "while someone might think the making of a le go gun is the action of a 5-year-old, to other 5-year-olds that might be a scary experience." finally italian sources tell fox news that top obama guru
or the environment but because they want the money. then you have the left coming towards it because they want to do something on climate. but then the question is does it have any serious bite at all and. >> john: the problem with nixon going to china, the young nixon would have smeared old nixon for doing it. and you have young tea party fresh men who don't like the idea of taxing polluters. progressive republicans, that is a term that exists, is there enough to make a move? >> probably not. >> john: we're both polyyanas. >> correct. >> john: you mentioned 75% of u.s. wind capacity is in republican congressional districts. why are they so posed to clean industry because they have it in lace. >> they're getting a lot of money from fossil fuel companies, and they have not figured out how to play that game very well so they have not give nearly as much money in campaign and lobbying fees. but it is changing in dynamics. there is no question that the republicans are hearing from their own constituents with these jobs. it's starting to change the dynamics, that and all this extreme weather hurricane sa
, luckily, it ended in, i guess you would say, safe environment and up fortunately, the shoppers that were there, the mothers and their children that were there shopping in the evening. >> sure. >> and the other, the employees, it was pretty much a very -- . >> in other words, and i think you were being clear, kind of a dumb move, even if his integs were good to uphold the first and sec amendments. thank you for weighing in and laying this out for us. we appreciate it. >> yes, sir. >>> coming up, why the cdc said it's -- its warning people about leavy green vegetables. >> and the twitching could be one step closer to -- twinkie could be one step closer to making a comeback. [ female announcer ] ] pillsby crescents are awesome. but when i cook up some beef, ketchup, relish and cheese, cover it with crescent dough and pow! cheeseburger crescent casserole. double awesome. pillsbury crescents. let the making begin. [ malcrrkkhshziiiizzlllee. to this symphony of flavor: beautiful. shhhhshshshshhshshhhhhsshhhshs. gorgeous! here comes the crescendo. kkerrrrbbuuuuuucraaackkk. just...incredible. pi
that in the future it could cause environment issues. >> they had 400 trucks a day coming in here. they still have about 40 trucks a day bringing in more debris. connell: when they get some of this debris being used? spec they get a lot of wood. there is enough would to fill a football field piled as high or higher than the goalpost. some of that, and a lot of that debris is being incinerated. a lot of it is being broken down into mulch. some of it is being made available to ordinary citizens. in some cases, one man brought his own sawmill out there. >> and manufacturing a product that could be used again and people can say this came from sandy, the storm, that damaged and affected so many people. there is a positive that can come out of it. >> a lot has been accomplished. so much is still left to be done, though. connell: thank you very much. we will shift gears and talk about oil prices here in a few minutes. we will get to this whole keystone pipeline issue. first, we told you about google's eric schmidt and his journey over to north korea. now, you can see, i guess, the results of that trip. y
for the environment, great for cars, is actually dangerous for the car, and in some cases, it voids your warranty. it's a big deal. what's the new research show? >> well, it goes into another part of the fuel system. the original research we look at looked at just the valves and the valve seals so it hurts your engine. now, this looks at the fuel components, itself, the pumps, the components of the distribution system. there are other parts of the vehicle, too, to be tested. it takes awhile to do this, but layer upon layer, the more we look, the more problems we're seeing. it's irresponsible to move forward in this fashion knowing full well that millions of cars in america could be affected. this is just, you know, epa's deal to push this fuel out to cars that were not designed to use it. melissa: talk about that specifically. in what cars is it safe? i understand in flex fuel vehicles and cars that are 20 # -- 2012 and knewer. -- newer. >> cars designed for that use, designed to handle e-15, and the auto companies went to congress saying we cannot warrantee our vehicles not designed to handle this.
of this. and economy, like china, you do have real domestic -- you have a very adverse environment and you still can maintain some growth. >> is very different. the issues that are applicable, there's a lot of room in focusing on this becomes fundamentally important now. in ordered see that it is a commodity market. it would be to use the proceeds for decoupling. i think we tend to be a dedicated militia. we have new words and we repeat them. and then we realize that what we need to understand right now is wider than africa's interest that we are well organized and we are not decoupled in the short-term. >> okay, moving on to be other issues, the question is that essentially the eurozone has no growth policy and relevant time horizons. the question is how to get through the next few years. it was talked about, and if i understood it, she more or less said it does take years to get back to normal and that's just what you'll have to live with. and there isn't really much that one can do about it. what would your response be on this issue in the relatively near term? >> yes, he was quoting a
will fight a rising ten-year yield environment. we're now 197. at least as of close of business yesterday. by june, a little above 2%. by the end of the year, 2.13%. not a lot. that may be one of the ropes why wall street is not so optimistic about stocks. it's got to fight this rising treasury yield. we'll see later in the afternoon that they're more optimistic about growth. they finally increased the gdp outlook but not by very much. let's look at what wall street thinks of the effect of this quantitative easing will have. pessimistic as they have been each time we asked this question about the ability of quantitative easing to lower unemployment. only 34% say qe will help in that regard. how about when it comes to lowering mortgage rates. a little more optimism. 54% versus 42%. bond yields, evenly split, 47%, 47%. but what can qe do? it can raise stock prices. 69% say it will have an effect on raising stock prices. we want to move on now to the next bit of the survey. when will the federal reserve hike rates. these are two distribution charts. it shows where the percentage of responden
wages or in a way that could get a better working environment, then it's okay. if you're not, saying your bored is going to cause some problems. >> especially if you're bored being on twitter and facebook. it depends on the category. the board upheld the filing of a reporter for the arizona daily star who was bored and posted online saying what? no overnight homicide? you're slacking, tucson. well, that was considered not acceptable for his employer at the newspaper. >> bad taste might be a problem. but what about how are companies handling this? are they being forced to expand their policies? i mean how broad does it need to be? >> the n.l.r.b. is actually urging or pushing companies to rewrite their policies so that they're in line with their new series of recommendations. so they're trying to get the cost-cos of the world and other large companies... >> target and general motors among those. >> ... to do it. wal-mart gets an a-plus because wal-mart already rewrote its policies to be more in line with what the n.l.r.b. is say joog what the chairman of the n.l.r.b. is saying is that
're actually o-- things could be worse, in the environment in the united states. and that always ends with the punch line, and sure enough things got worse, here we are. >> but to explain, and for purposes we ran a experiment, an some countries didn't. >> and up to that point, the track of recovery had been about the same in the u.s. and britain. since then, we've started to recover, and they are in a recession. >> thank you for joining us. >> all right, we'll be right back with a rachel maddow show, bullpucky alert, this proves to be a real life pile of bull. hold on. blac girl: ok. dad: you look so pretty. ♪ i'm overprotective. that's why i got a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. every signature is unique, and every fingerprint unrepeatable. at sleep number, we recognize the incredible diversity
to figure out what works and what doesn't in initial public offering. granted, the environment's gotten better, but there are many things we can learn from what happened in 2012. first of all, as difficult as last year may have seemed at times, the overall ipo market was pretty darn robust. in terms of price appreciation, the average new public company was up 20.5% versus 13.4% gain, the s&p 500. in 2012, ipos gave you an average first-day spike of 14.1%, that's not too shabby. however, while the general direction was up, it was a major divergence within 2012's cohort. a lot of winners and quite a few losers too. what separated the winners from losers? what made the difference between an ipo that popped huge on the first day of trading and kept running, and one that did a big fat belly flop? simple, one word, growth. last year the ipos with real sustainable unquestionable growth were the best performers, and this is a dynamic that only continued in 2013 where the market's appetite for growth cannot be sated. consider 2012's best-performing ipos. top eight performers each gave you at lea
-style austerity and have bad money the way they did. we're actually -- things could be worse, in the environment in the united states. and that always ends with the punch line, and sure enough things got worse, here we are. >> but to explain, and for purposes we ran a experiment, an some countries didn't. >> and up to that point, the track of recovery had been about the same in the u.s. and britain. since then, we've started to recover, and they are in a recession. >> thank you for joining us. >> all right, we'll be right back with a rachel maddow show, bullpucky alert, this proves to be a real life pile of bull. hold on. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days.
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